Tag Archives: John Scalzi

Friday Link: Who Gets to Be a Geek? Anyone Who Wants to Be

Who gets to claim the term “geek” (or “nerd”, depending on your definition)? Am I geeky enough? If I don’t watch anime or read comics/manga or do any kind of gaming or know much about computers or keep up with the latest SF/F TV shows (all true of me), am I still a geek?

Being an individual with a strong dose of self-criticism, I’ve sometimes asked myself these questions. So I was thrilled to read this piece by writer (and SFWA president) John Scalzi:

Geekdom is a nation with open borders. There are many affiliations and many doors into it. There are lit geeks, media geeks, comics geeks, anime and manga geeks. There are LARPers, cosplayers, furries, filkers, crafters, gamers and tabletoppers. There are goths and horror geeks and steampunkers and academics. There are nerd rockers and writers and artists and actors and fans. Some people love only one thing. Some people flit between fandoms. Some people are positively poly in their geek enthusiasms. Some people have been in geekdom since before they knew they were geeks. Some people are n00bs, trying out an aspect of geekdom to see if it fits. If it does, great. If it doesn’t then at least they tried it.

He’s writing in the context of criticizing another blog piece, which focuses on pretty girls coming into a con and parading around in outfits featuring characters they’re not familiar with. Or something. But the quotation above, and the rest of what he says in that vein, is the part that really resonates with me.

Go read the rest. You won’t regret it. (Unless you’re unusually sensitive to snark, and even then, bear with him, because it’s worth it. His posts where he’s arguing about something are so well constructed, they’re things of beauty.)

That’s it for this week. See you on Monday!

Friday Links: RIP Ray Bradbury

You’ve probably already heard the news that Ray Bradbury passed away this week. To me, he was a master of the twist ending, of combining science fictional ideas with beautiful prose. I remember being shaken by “The Veldt” and “All Summer in a Day” and “There Will Come Soft Rains” — I thought the endings were horribly sad, but I also never forgot them. Fahrenheit 451 also made a great impression on me, with its mingled dystopia and destruction and hope and sense of wonder. He was truly a giant.

Here’s a collection of remembrances and other related things from around the ‘net this week.

Neil Gaiman posted two tributes, one on his blog and one in the British newspaper The Guardian.

Gaiman also posted an audio file of himself reading a beautiful short story called “The Man Who Forgot Ray Bradbury”. This is what finally made me cry. (Side note: even if you’re not big on audiobooks, if you haven’t heard Gaiman reading, go listen! He’s brilliant at it.)

SF author John Scalzi posted a tribute on his blog.

The New Yorker published a piece by Bradbury himself (via Better Know a Book).

Long may he be remembered.

Weekly Roundup

Happy Easter long weekend to those of you who are lucky enough to have one! Here’s the best of what I found online this week…

Book News

Toronto writer Leah Bobet is celebrating the release of her debut novel, Above, featured as a Big Idea piece on John Scalzi’s blog.

General Geekery

The Mary Sue has found art of dapper dinosaurs in top hats.

For the aspiring Companions among us, Doctor Who sticky notes (also via The Mary Sue).

Inspiration

If Narnia is more your style, go forth and ogle this Dawn Treader concept art.

For Writers (and Interested Third Parties)

Adam Roberts has a fascinating post about the importance of monsters as myth and how bigger is not always better (via Juliette Wade).

John Scalzi points out that the identity of the bad guys in science fiction movies often depends on one’s point of view.

 

That’s all for this round. Have a wonderful long weekend!